UEFA drops legal actions against the European Super League pioneers

European football’s governing body (UEFA) has let go of its legal suit against Super League organizerS Barcelona, Juventus, and Real Madrid over their complicity in the European Super League.

Earlier this year, The trio of Barcelona, Juventus, and Real Madrid were fused by the Premier League’s top clubs dubbed ‘Big Six’ and three more clubs when trying to engender a breakaway league.

The idea quickly fell apart due to unprecedented backlash and disapproval from fans, and in May, UEFA filed a disciplinary action against the three remaining clubs who stayed committed.

Barcelona, Juventus, and Real Madrid are the remaining three who stayed committed to the creation of the European Super League after the likes of Arsenal, Chelsea, Liverpool, Manchester City, Manchester United, Tottenham, Atletico Madrid, AC Milan, and Inter Milan withdrew from participating in the league.

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UEFA was gutted about the idea of having a separate league that could overshadow the existing UEFA competitions. They couldn’t swallow the bitter pill and a disciplinary proceeding was opened in May but they have since declared it “null and void”.

On Monday, UEFA released a statement about the case. The statement reads:

“FOLLOWING THE STAY OF PROCEEDINGS AGAINST FC BARCELONA, JUVENTUS FC AND REAL MADRID CF, IN THE MATTER RELATED TO A POTENTIAL VIOLATION OF UEFA’S LEGAL FRAMEWORK IN CONNECTION WITH THE SO-CALLED ‘SUPER LEAGUE’, THE UEFA APPEALS BODY HAS DECLARED TODAY THE PROCEEDINGS NULL AND VOID, AS IF THE PROCEEDINGS HAD NEVER BEEN OPENED”.

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The culprits of the super league ideas Barcelona, Juventus, and Real Madrid were all permitted to participate in this season’s UEFA Champions League despite their involvement.

UEFA also reportedly pardoned the other nine clubs – Arsenal, Chelsea, Liverpool, Manchester City, Manchester United, Tottenham, Atletico Madrid, AC Milan.

In May, the other nine clubs had consented to pay a combined fine of €15m for their complicity plus have five percent of their UEFA competition revenue deducted for a season. They’re all pardoned and a fine will no longer need to be paid.